Ruffles – fashion trends associated with war and royalty

Ruffles - fashion trends associated with war and royalty

Looking meek and timid, ruffles were first worn by men in the 16th century. Historically, duckweed is a design associated with royalty and wars. It has been a long journey for the duckweed to become the symbol of feminine beauty as it is today. Let’s review the development journey of duckweed throughout history.

The ruffles trend originated from war fashion

The ruffle was actually first used by gentlemen. It all started in the sixteenth century in Spain. At this time, the soldiers rolled up the outer sleeves to reveal the folds of the inner sleeves. Inspired by that image, the tailors of that time threaded strings into the clothes and tied them, creating the first ruffled line in fashion.

The ruffle became an accessory of nobility

The ruffle became an accessory of nobility
The ruffles became an accessory of nobility

By the time of Queen Elizabeth I of Great Britain, the ruffle had become the ruff, a neck accessory with sturdy ruffles. In fact, it is not inherently a fashion product. Ruff is intended to keep the body upright, creating an elegant and noble look for the wearer. Because it was too inconvenient, gradually, the neck ruff became an accessory exclusively for the British aristocracy and upper class at that time. From the great writer William Shakespeare to Queen Elizabeth I, everyone has appeared in a portrait with a ruff.

At its height, a ruff could be designed to stretch nearly 30 centimeters wide. Inside threaded steel wire to fix the folds. Even people have created a special type of ironing iron, only used to create pleated lines.

Used to be associated with men’s style

Today, when it comes to duckweed, people think of the feminine style. But the rumpled capital was an item worn by gentlemen in the ancient period.

Used to be associated with men's style
Used to be associated with men’s style

Portraits of any famous eighteenth-century Western figure also appear jabot. That proves how loved and respected this ruffled accessory is. From the lavish royal attire of the French queen Marie Antoinette, to the clothes of the American revolutionary Alexander Hamilton, duckweed appeared everywhere. They transcend political views as well as gender and geography.

Portraits of any famous eighteenth-century Western figure also appear jabot
Portraits of any famous eighteenth-century Western figure also appear jabot

In the 19th century, duckweed became popular with the common people. This era marked the emergence of Dandyism, a sleek, polished menswear style. Shrimp-tailed tuxedos, tight tights, and ruffled ties are typical of this style. However, because of the excessive momentum and obvious femininity, this style quickly receded.

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